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My Favorite Quotes

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 Carol Williams - “Usually children spend more time in the garden than anybody else. It is where they learn about the world, because they can be in it unsupervised, yet protected. Some gardeners will remember from their own earliest recollections that no one sees the garden as vividly, or cares about it as passionately, as the child who grows up in it.”  
 Carol Williams - “People are turning to their gardens not to consume but to actively create, not to escape from reality but to observe it closely. In doing this they experience the connectedness of creation and the profoundest sources of being. That the world we live in and the activity of making it are one seamless whole is something that we may occasionally glimpse. In the garden, we know.”  
 Carol Williams - “An agricultural adage says the tiny animals that live below the surface of a healthy pasture weigh more than the cows grazing above it. In a catalogue selling composting equipment I read that two handfuls of healthy soil contain more living organisms than there are people on the earth. What these beings are and what they can be doing is difficult to even begin to comprehend, but it helps to realize that even though they are many, they work as one.”  
 Ken Wilbur - “Bad Gardens copy, good gardens create, great gardens transcend. What all great gardens have in common are their ability to pull the sensitive viewer out of him or herself and into the garden, so completely that the separate self-sense disappears entirely, and at least for a brief moment one is ushered into a nondual and timeless awareness. A great garden, in other words, is mystical no matter what its actual content.”  
 Katharine S. White - “As I write, snow is falling outside my Maine window, and indoors all around me half a hundred garden catalogues are in bloom.”  
 Katharine S. White - “Fragrance, whether strong or delicate, is a highly subjective matter, and one gardener's perfume is another gardener's stink.”  
 Katharine S. White - “Home would not be home to me without a lawn, and if there are, as I've recently read, twenty-five million home lawns in the United States, at least fifty million other Americans must agree with me.”  
 Katharine S. White - “Consider the many special delights a lawn affords soft mattress for a creeping baby worm hatchery for a robin croquet or badminton court baseball diamond restful green perspectives leading the eye to a background of flower beds, shrubs, or hedge green shadows - 'This lawn, a carpet all aliveWith shadows flung from leaves' - as changing and as spellbinding as the waves of the sea, whether flecked with sunlight under trees of light foliage, like elm and locust, or deep, dark, solid shade, moving slowly as the tide, under maple and oak. This carpet”  
 Edith Wharton - “It is the omnipresent rush of water which give the Este Gardens their peculiar character. From the Anio, drawn up the hillside at incalculable cost and labour, a thousand rills gush downward, terrace by terrace, channeling the stone rails of the balusters, leaping from step to step, dripping into mossy conches, flashing in spray from the horns of sea-gods and the jaws of mythical monsters, or forcing themselves in irrepressible overflow down the ivy-matted banks.”  
 Emily Whaley - “Though there are other ways to finance your gardening, one sucessful way is to choose carefully whom you marry. A good and generous man is needed, one who knows how to make money and enjoys sharing it, one who himself is not interested in the actual pursuit of gardening but likes to be proud of the premises.”  
 Theresa Watkins - “Finding what brings peace and joy to your heart is important after a hard day at work, or just living in our intense world. Walking through your garden at the end of the day can rejuvenate you. I wonder if God, Allah, Jehovah, Shiva, Gaia or whatever Supreme Being you have come to know, looks down on the Garden that He or She created with all the different varieties of life and 'oohs and aahs ' It is a curious thought, but I think so.”  
 Theresa Watkins - “Every garden is unique with a multitude of choices in soils, plants and themes. Finding your garden theme is as easy as seeing what brings a smile to your face.”  
 Charles Dudley Warner - “The love of dirt is among the earliest of passions, as it is the latest. Mud-pies gratify one of our first and best instincts. So long as we are dirty, we are pure. Fondness for the ground comes back to a man after he has run the round of pleasure and business, eaten dirt, and sown wild oats, drifted about the world, and taken the wind of all its moods. The love of digging in the ground (or of looking on while he pays another to dig) is as sure to come back to him, as he is sure, at last, to go under the ground, and stay there.”  
 Charles Dudley Warner - “A garden is an awful responsibility. You never know what you may be aiding to grow in it.”  
 Francois Voltaire - “I also know that we should cultivate our gardens.”  
 Rosemary Verey - “Colours change in the morning light, red shines out bright and clear and the blues merge into their surroundings, melting into the greens but by the evening the reds loose their piquancy, embracing a quieter tone and shifting toward the blues in the rainbow. Yellow flowers remain bright, and white ones become luminous, shining like ghostly figures against a darkening green background.”  
 Unknown - “Wherever man exists, he finds the need to redesign, to recreate the world. A more beautiful world, purer, sweeter smelling and more colorful. A garden is probably the spot where the hopes for civilization are best captured. In fact, man defines himself by his garden.”  
 Unknown - “Whatever else seems pleasant at first apprehension, at length becomes dull by too long acquaintance. But the pleasures of a Garden are every day renewed. A Garden is the only complete delight the world affords, ever complying with our various and mutable Minds.”  
 Unknown - “Cares melt when you kneel in your garden.”  
 Unknown - “As the Garden Grows, so does the Gardener.”  
 Unknown - “Why do plants have such a positive impact on us There are a number of reasons, including They have a predictable cycle of life that provides comfort in our time of rapid change. They are responsive but nonthreatening. They form no opinions or judgments about their caregivers. They soften our manmade environment. They enable us to change or improve our environment. They promote relaxation and tranquility.”  
 Unknown - “Mental sunshine will cause the flowers of peace, happiness and prosperity to grow upon the face of the earth. Be a creator of mental sunshine.”  
 Unknown - “Thousands and thousands of acres in the United States are being sprayed annually with nearly 50 million pounds of Roundup, a broadspectrum herbicide designed to kill any plant it hits, unless the plant has been genetically altered to tolerate the chemical. Roundup has accounted for half of Monsanto's corporate profits in recent years.”  
 Unknown - “A research project in Australia, entitled 'The Congruent Garden an Investigation into the Role of the Domestic Garden in Satisfying Fundamental Human Needs,' interviewed gardeners on the values of gardening in their everyday lives. The researchers established that gardens have the potential to satisfy nine basic human needs (subsistence, protection, affection, understanding, participation, leisure, creation, identity, freedom) across four existential states (being, having, doing and interacting.)”  
 Unknown - “Now in the east the white bean and the great squash are tied with the rainbow. Listen the rain's drawing near The voice of the bluebird is heard.”  

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