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My Favorite Quotes
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 Bruce Lahn - “If we look at multiple genes, the ethnic variations such as the ones we found are likely to be counterbalanced by other differences. Just because these genes are still evolving, doesn't necessarily mean they make you any smarter. We've evolved genes for selfishness, violence, cruelty - all of which are in place because they may make survival easier.”
 Bruce Lahn - “If we look at multiple genes, the ethnic variations such as the ones we found are likely to be counterbalanced by other differences. Just because these genes are still evolving, doesn't necessarily mean they make you any smarter. We've evolved genes for selfishness, violence, cruelty - all of which are in place because they may make survival easier.”
 Bruce Lahn - “If we look at multiple genes, the ethnic variations such as the ones we found are likely to be counterbalanced by other differences. Just because these genes are still evolving, doesn't necessarily mean they make you any smarter. We've evolved genes for selfishness, violence, cruelty - all of which are in place because they may make survival easier.”
 Bruce Lahn - “If we look at multiple genes, the ethnic variations such as the ones we found are likely to be counterbalanced by other differences. Just because these genes are still evolving, doesn't necessarily mean they make you any smarter. We've evolved genes for selfishness, violence, cruelty - all of which are in place because they may make survival easier.”
 Bruce Lahn - “If we look at multiple genes, the ethnic variations such as the ones we found are likely to be counterbalanced by other differences. Just because these genes are still evolving, doesn't necessarily mean they make you any smarter. We've evolved genes for selfishness, violence, cruelty - all of which are in place because they may make survival easier.”
 Bruce Lahn - “People like to think of modern human biology, and especially mental biology, as being the result of selections that took place 100,000 years ago. But our research shows that humans are still under selection, not just for things like disease resistance but for cognitive abilities.”
 Bruce Lahn - “In a very short period of time, this class of variants arose from a single copy to many copies. That implies that this must have happened because of positive selection.”
 Bruce Lahn - “My concern is that this is going to become justification for prejudices against certain groups.”
 Stanley Plahn - “That cat became quite a companion to me. She filled a void after my wife became ill and passed away about 10 years ago. Since then it was me and the cat for me to leave her was hard. Sophie has filled that void that was left by my cat, who filled the void left by my wife.”
 Stanley Plahn - “Whenever you get that lonely feeling, you just head out looking for Sophie. She'll always let you scratch her ears or pet her it takes care of the loneliness a person has in their heart.”
 Bruce Lahn - “The frequency of the gene increases because people who carry these genes are more fit and they have more kids. We think each gene conveys some sort of fitness advantage in brain biology. It could be an improved cognitive function or a personality trait. We're not sure. But we know whatever consequence they render is highly favored by selection.”
 Bruce Lahn - “I think a lot of people might consider humans to be at the pinnacle of evolutionary lineage -- that we have achieved an advanced state as a species, and we have basically become the end-game. But what we found indicates that the species -- particularly when it comes to the brain, which is perhaps our most defining feature -- is still evolving.”
 Bruce Lahn - “Our studies indicate that the trend that is the defining characteristic of human evolution -- the growth of brain size and complexity -- is likely still going on. If our species survives for another million years or so, I would imagine that the brain by then would show significant structural differences from the human brain of today.”
 Bruce Lahn - “The jury is still out on what this means because we aren't entirely sure what these genes do. It's possible they just control size and shape of the brain, rather than cognition. But the data is pretty compelling that the brain is evolving.”
 Bruce Lahn - “If we look at multiple genes, the ethnic variations--such as the ones we found--are likely to be counterbalanced by other differences. It just happens that we looked at two genes for which the variants favored by selection have a higher frequency in some populations, such as Europeans. It might be that for the next two brain size genes we find, the variants favored by selection will have a higher frequency in Asians or Africans.”
 Bruce Lahn - “Our studies indicate that the trend that is the defining characteristic of human evolution - the growth of brain size and complexity - is likely still going on. If our species survives for another million years or so, I would imagine that the brain by then would show significant structural differences from the human brain of today.”
 Bruce Lahn - “They may have arisen in Europe or the Middle East and spread more readily east and west due to human migrations, as opposed to south to Africa because of geographic barriers. Or, they could have arisen in Africa, and increased in frequency once early humans migrated out of Africa.”
 Bruce Lahn - “Meanwhile, our environment and the skills we need to survive in it are changing faster then we ever imagined. I would expect the human brain, which has done well by us so far, will continue to adapt to those changes.”
 Bruce Lahn - “Our studies indicate that the trend that is the defining characteristic of human evolution--the growth of brain size and complexity--is likely still going on. Meanwhile, our environment and the skills we need to survive in it are changing faster then we ever imagined. I would expect the human brain, which has done well by us so far, will continue to adapt to those changes.”
 Bruce Lahn - “In another 10,000 or 20,000 years, I think the human brain may acquire a form that is quite different than the human brain today. Not necessarily in its shape, which may remain relatively the same. But the function may be different. It may be, on average, a little smarter. Or it may acquire certain skills that in its current form it isn't well-equipped to handle -- advanced cognitive abilities such as abstract reasoning. We don't really know for sure how -- but we are still evolving.”
 Denise Klahn - “Fashion is something that goes in one year and out the other.”