George Eliot (Mary Anne Evans) Quotes

Wear a smile and have friends; wear a scowl and have wrinkles. What do we live for if not to make the world less difficult for each other?

Correct English is the slang of prigs who write history and essays. And the strongest slang of all is the slang of poets.

Correct English is the slang of prigs who write history and essays. And the strongest stand of all is the slang of poets.

More helpful than all wisdom is one draught of simple pity that will not forsake us.

An election is coming. Universal peace is declared, and the foxes have a sincere interest in prolonging the lives of the poultry.

A patronizing disposition always has its meaner side.

It is easy finding reasons why other folks should be patient.

With memory set smarting like a reopened wound, a man’s past is not simply a dead history, an outworn preparation of the present: it is not a repented error shaken loose from the life: it is a still quivering part of himself, bringing shudders and bitter flavors and the tinglings of a merited shame.

In every parting there is an image of death.

Our passions do not live apart in locked chambers, but, dressed in their small wardrobe of notions, bring their provisions to a common table and mess together, feeding out of the common store according to their appetite.